18 February 2015

"All Shall Rise from the Dead," Alma 11:41-46

Alma 11:41-46

These verse contain, in all of scripture, one of the most comprehensive declarations on the Resurrection, its purpose and  nature.

Purpose of the Resurrection

"for behold, the day cometh that all shall rise from the dead and stand before God, and be judged according to their works." (vs. 41)

"and we shall be brought to stand before God, knowing even as we know now, and have a bright recollection of all our guilt." (vs. 43)

"and shall be brought and be arraigned before the bar of Christ the Son, and God the Father, and the Holy Spirit, which is one Eternal God, to be judged according to their works, whether they be good or whether they be evil." (vs. 44)

Nature of the Resurrection

"Therefore the wicked remain as though there had been no redemption made, except it be the loosing of the bands of death;"  (vs. 41)

"Now, there is a death which is called a temporal death; and the death of Christ shall loose the bands of this temporal death, that all shall be raised from this temporal death.
"The spirit and the body shall be reunited again in its perfect form; both limb and joint shall be restored to its proper frame, even as we now are at this time;" (vs. 42-43)

"Now, this restoration shall come to all, both old and young, both bond and free, both male and female, both the wicked and the righteous; and even there shall not so much as a hair of their heads be lost; but every thing shall be restored to its perfect frame, as it is now, or in the body," (vs.44)

"Now, behold, I have spoken unto you concerning the death of the mortal body, and also concerning the resurrection of the mortal body. I say unto you that this mortal body is raised to an immortal body, that is from death, even from the first death unto life, that they can die no more; their spirits uniting with their bodies, never to be divided; thus the whole becoming spiritual and immortal, that they can no more see corruption." (vs.45)

The Effect of Pure Testimony

In the final verse of the chapter, we read how the people were astonished at Amulek's words and Zeezrom began to tremble. By the end of this robust declaration of the Resurrection, it becomes apparent that Amulek understands quite well the things of which he is being questioned.

Additional Witnesses


What other testimonies exist in the scriptures of the resurrection?

2 Nephi 9:11-16 - Jacob (brother of Nephi) explains the great plan of God, of which the resurrection occupies an important component.

Alma 40:15-24 - Clarification on the term "first resurrection."

1 Corinthians 15 - A comprehensive explanation of the resurrection, and how without it, the rest of our faith is vain. Reading this causes me to consider the type of "seed" or life I am preparing to plant for the resurrection.


11 February 2015

"As Though There Had Been no Redemption Made," Alma 11:40-11

Alma 11:40-41

After explaining the truly prominent and omnipotent position that Christ possesses in the grand plan of life, Amulek goes on to explain how Christ's mission is to "redeem his people and... take upon him the transgressions of those who believe upon his name." (vs 40)

There is a chilling declaration in vs. 41, "Therefore the wicked remain as though there had been no redemption made." A footnote on the verse asks this question:
For what doth it profit a man if a gift is bestowed upon him, and he receive not the gift? Behold, he rejoices not in that which is given unto him, neither rejoices in him who is the giver of the gift. (Doctrine and Covenants 88:33)
One cannot appreciate the Atonement of Christ until one has received of its power and tasted of its influence, and been healed. But oh what joy and peace that gift does bring! 

08 February 2015

"Yea, He Is the Very Eternal Father," Alma 11:38-39

Alma 11:38-39

In verse 38, Zeezrom attempts to snare Amulek with one final question: "Is the Son of God the very Eternal Father?" It feels as if Zeezrom is backpedaling at this point, having gained no advantage over Amulek because of his words. Then the answer that Amulek gives in reply is both astonishing and remarkably detailed and compellingly convincing.

This title of Christ as the "Eternal Father" is one that, because of Amulek's response, I have taken more time to study and understand it. Zeezrom's question comes of the fact that superficially the title of Eternal Father seems to contradict the title of Son of God. Other scriptures explain the relationship between the titles (Mosiah 15:2-4, Mosiah 5:7). Yet, Amulek's simple explanation also suffices in creating an understanding of why Christ is called the Eternal Father. Christ, the Son of God, is the Creator. His work is the heavens and the earth, "and all things which in them are." (vs. 39) Amulek goes on to explain that His existence is everlasting or eternal, from the beginning to the end of time, the first and the last. Hence, a proper and appropriate title is Eternal Father. 

Prayer has for me personally validated this particular study on the topic, and also given me an even deeper appreciates for both Jesus Christ (the Eternal Father) and His Father, our Heavenly Father.