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"An Awful Death," Alma 40:22-26

Alma 40:22-26

Ezekiel 37:6-14 - This prophecy of Ezekiel is a key indicator of divine priority.


These last few verses at the end of the chapter are a testimony of the reality and nature of the resurrection, and the consignments of the wicked and the righteous thereafter.

What questions should I be asking about these verses?

Continue in verse 26 tomorrow. There are a number of footnotes on "the death of the wicked," or that death which "pertains to the things of righteousness."

So I have spent the morning studying this death of the wicked, by reading the footnotes on "death" as referenced in title of this post, or "an awful death of the wicked."  Doctrine and Covenants 29:41 truly illustrates the seriousness of that predicament. He first is talking about the spiritual death that came upon Adam when he was cast out of the Garden of Eden:

...wherein he became spiritually dead, which is the first death, even that same death which is the last death, which is spiritual, which shall be pronounced upon the wicked when I shall say: Depart, ye cursed.
 So the condition of separation from the presence of God is spiritual death, and this separation from the presence of God is the great and last awful death pronounced upon the wicked. Why?

That final statement jogs in my memory the reasons. "Depart, ye cursed." When does the Lord say this? Matthew 25:41

I felt at first that this illustrated the great importance of learning to listen to the influence and promptings of the Holy Spirit, but there was another footnote that lead to Doctrine and Covenants 76:37 which reminded me that only those rare few that have this statement pronounced upon them are those that the second death will have any claim on.

But why are they cast out? It is because "they are unclean, and no unclean thing can inherit the kingdom of God;"

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This morning's passages were a study in the promotion and demotion of the kings of the earth. From a string of footnotes at the very end of the chapter, I have been brought to consider  how the hand of the Lord raises up one and puts down another, usually because of the pride and vanity of the former.

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