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"Cleave unto God as He Cleaveth unto You," Jacob 6

Jacob 6

In verse 5, Jacob commands his brethren to "cleave unto God as he cleaveth unto you." The association illustrates a truth that I seldom would consider: God already has an intimate, personal relationship with me. I know that this goes along the lines of a supreme being who knows all my thoughts and actions, but something strikes me as exceptionally personal in that omniscience, not as a removed, observational unit. Really, it makes sense. Why would someone want to know everything about you or me, without being intimately concerned for your well being and safety.

Footnotes on cleave lead to the account of Hezekiah, king of Judah, and his interactions with Assyria. Isaiah was prophet during the reign of Hezekiah. He offered spiritual strength to Hezekiah to withstand the tenacious cries of the messenger of the king of Assyria, who repeatedly came down from Assyria threatening Hezekiah with destruction if they did not submit to their rule. What was more, the messenger from Assyria denounced any source of strength that Judah might recur to for help. Of all the kings of Judah, none is regarded with the same zeal towards God as was Hezekiah.

In verse 9, Jacob talks about "the power of the redemption and the resurrection, which is in Christ." This is the means whereby we will be judged according to our works. Just last evening, I also read in 2 Nephi 2:10:
And because of the intercession for all, all men come unto God; wherefore, they stand in the presence of him, to be judged of him according to the truth and holiness which is in him.
 I appreciate how Jacob explains that it is through the power of the redemption and the resurrection of Jesus Christ that judgment is executed. Through Christ, the way is prepared for our ability to obtain immortality (the resurrection) and eternal life (the redemption).

In verse 12, Jacob is concluding his remarks to his brethren, and he says these simple words: "Oh be wise, what more can I say?" There are footnotes on the word "wise":
Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves. - Matthew 10:16
The illustration is that the Savior provides is keenly accurate. In the midst of flesh-consuming wolves, we are commanded to keep pure thoughts and actions, to do good to others, to cleave to virtue, holiness, and truth.
Be wise in the days of your probation; strip yourselves of all uncleanness; ask not, that ye may consume it on your lusts, but ask with a firmness unshaken, that ye will yield to no temptation, but that ye will serve the true and living God. - Mormon 9:28
 This second passage brings to mind the Savior's commandment to "knock and it shall be open to you,"(see Matt 7:7), and reminds me  to what end we have been commanded to seek God.


  1. The idea that God cleaves unto me is one of the most tender concepts i've ever come across in the scriptures. this verse in jacob is one of my favorites.


  2. This idea of cleaving unto him as he cleaves to us jumped out at me this morning and I did a search on that phrase and found your article. Thanks for posting this. It makes me think of the unimaginable love a parent has for a child and as they grow they just want them to cleave to the truths and knowledge they have as the teenage child wants to kick and fight but the parent still cleaves and his love doesn't end and he rejoices in any progress that child makes. I love this beautiful image.


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