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"I Knew Concerning These Things, Yet I Would Not Know," Alma 10:1-6

Alma 10:1-6

In these verses we have an introduction of Amulek, a self-described "man of no small reputation among all those who know me... [having] many kindreds and friends, and... acquired much riches by the hand of my industry." (vs. 4) So then Amulek, a man who is influential, well connected, and well to do in temporal means, immediately in the next verses makes a public confession:
Nevertheless, after all this, I never have known much of the ways of the Lord, and his mysteries and marvelous power. I said I never had known much of these things; but behold, I mistake, for I have seen much of his mysteries and his marvelous power; yea, even in the preservation of the lives of this people.
Nevertheless, I did harden my heart, for I was called many times and I would not hear; therefore I knew concerning these things, yet I would not know; (vs. 5-6)
 What we have here in the words of Amulek, is a recognition of his own personal rebellion against God. In the open remarks of Amulek, he gives his genealogy or an account of his ancestral line pointing to some key
players such as Aminadi, whom he credits with "interpreted the writing which was upon the wall of the temple, which was written by the finger of God." (vs. 2) What Amulek seems to be getting at here is that there was a heritage of righteousness within his own family history, and that as such, he did have some knowledge already of the ways of God, the ways of righteousness, yet he didn't want to have any part in extending that family heritage down into his own life experience.

In this regard, Amulek is much like the rest of the people of Ammonihah, having a rich heritage of faith to build upon, but having had rejected it entirely.

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